View the Results of our Outdoor Media Survey

View the Results of our Outdoor Media Survey

How would you summarise your day to family and friends using only 7 or 8 words? Telling brand stories through outdoor media carries a similar challenge as shown in our recent survey of 107 designs.

We analysed creative across fashion, film, finance, education, entertainment, health and fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) industries for a recent industry whitepaper and have summarised the tasty bits.

What we are finding is less surprising, more reinforcing of the need to speak above the noise. Our Creative Director, James has worked with leading national and global businesses to help with their messaging, including Woolworths, and Menulog and had this to say when reviewing the data:

"Viewers wait for only about 9 seconds when deciding whether or not to keep watching a video. We're seeing similar behaviour with outdoor media. Passers by may have less time to absorb the message so effective words and imagery that fits are critical - the numbers here are a good guide to what's out there at the moment to get the message through and it’s similar no matter the type of outdoor creative."

Landscape Billboards

  • Artwork with a single title or tagline used a median of only 4 words (18 characters).
  • Those with a primary and secondary text line had 4 words (22 characters) for the primary and an average of words (23 characters) for the secondary.
  • How visual were they? 82% had images in the background that covered 100% of the poster.

Portrait Billboards

  • Artworks with a single title or tagline used a median of 5 words (25 characters).
  • Those with a primary and secondary text line had 4 words (25 characters) for the primary and 3 words (20 characters) for the secondary.
  • How visual were they? Similar to the landscape format – 73% had images in the background that covered 100% of the poster.

Like the horizontal formats, there were other dribs and drabs of content not counted. These served as disclaimers, extended clarifications or branding that carry little apparent importance for many viewers but are legislative requirements.

Film and Fashion Outdoor Media
We did not include the creative for movies and fashion products in the above data because these industries seemed to stand-alone.

Movie posters usually had imagery or artwork covering all of the background area. Actors, directors, testimonials, award names and sometimes a date featured as the core set of elements. The combination of these elements dictated the layout. For one film, actors may be most important, awards for another and so on.

Fashion outdoor creative also near always had full-poster images. The image was always of pristine quality and clearly posed in an art directed manner purposed for the message and format. Usually only the brand name accompanied the photo.

How to Get Your Fans Engaged
Fans like posts and share visually captivating media or witty words. Your outdoor design will need to be the same if you expect their helping hands.

We looked online to blogs to see what outdoor media appears in stories. 31 of these 46 outdoor creatives were highly visual and included creative elements that were not part of the flat poster, such as elements of the poster that went outside of the frame and onto its surrounding pavement. Magic Mike XXL posters would reveal a little bit more when the sun went down each night (we'll let you google that one!) 

It doesn't work for every brand, but it is one way to encourage social engagement of the creative.

The Takeaway 
Our results show everything points to snappier words, bigger brighter imagery, and planned strategy prior to concept if your artwork's surrounding audience are to turn heads, snap, share, and engage with your brand.

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